Author Topic: Here are ten sentences  (Read 2848 times)

SimonH

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Re: Here are ten sentences
« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2011, 01:31:24 pm »
(see below)
« Last Edit: May 07, 2011, 01:38:41 pm by SimonH »

SimonH

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Re: Here are ten sentences
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2011, 01:34:37 pm »
1. The third novice dreams of escape, of the thrill of sea-fret on a windy day ... but the key on a string is always a jump & a courtyard out of reach – the experienced novice (the second novice, as it were) – thinks of the first novice as always already ‘depressed’; as though the first novice were the fourth novice, the ancestral novice or the fool: & unnoticed, future music paints the floor gold with moon-dark & a wind brings sea-fret into the practice room.

2. The fonder they get the more foundlings they fondle, then they make an expedition of themselves.

3. Love supple purple opal logo hot-pants? now watch the crows eating soup & candlewicks, primetime.

4. Close up cinema, the gorgeous mouth gorging gobbets of melon; on the promontory a glad noise, Vesuvius erupting the while.

5. Bruckner was the tallest Catholic in Wal-Mart that afternoon.

6. Windowless ... sepia ... bicycled fish (battered) ...repeat proscription ... small bit o’carpet ... meta-garment ... windswept ... screamily ... delicious Battenberg ... oft soft moustache ... crowd controller ... bayoneteer ... Salomé ... a runaway in danger (naked) from hornet infestation ... undated worksheet.

7. Art & fish make a pious dish.

8. Aesthetic agreement might as much be due to the fact that we deprave people than that we deprive them of the means whereby to estimate delight; as in “operations for aesthetic advancement” – pertains to the fact there is nothing to see at sea (Melville).

9. You find somone & you go through emotions & it isn’t easier not to find someone whose emotions go through you & then it’s cold again, very cold anywhere.

10. X = X.

My 10 together. Thanks Drypht, I enjoyed doing them :). (A bit of cheating, I'm afraid).
« Last Edit: May 07, 2011, 01:41:30 pm by SimonH »

Offline Ubu-Impudicus

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Re: Here are ten sentences
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2011, 04:45:27 pm »

8. Aesthetic disagreement might as much be due to the fact that we deprive people of opportunities for aesthetic advancement as to the fact that there is nothing to see.

 We have everything to see, & are seeing it, & that is nothing if not. Wanting to see & hear everything for want of due advancement to the opportunistic fact (fact), we the people deprive people of disagreement as to olfactory farming.  

Chafing Dish

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simon howard

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Re: Here are ten sentences
« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2012, 04:40:03 pm »
" ... the meaning of a poem, contrary to that of a metaphor, is standardly experienced as a kind of problem." Is it, though? Why "a problem"? & (b) "this act of making meaningful in an altogether basic sense: what must a critic first do with language of the especially difficult poetic sort so much as to get it to appear to speak?"

I don't recognise (a) as a standard experience in reading a poem, or (b) as something that critics who interest me do. It's as though reading a poem is to translate a poem as in make what is foreign to the reader's language mean something in the reader's language, whereas for me poems are inwardly translations ... so untranslatable as such & yet continually translating, which opens spaces for translation :-\.

"... the full generation of poetic meaning — that is, of the densely wrought patterns of significance and sense a talented critic will attribute to a poem — will require much more than the minimal activity of making-meaningful I am considering in this paper." Why bother with the poem in the first place - why not read "the densely wrought patterns of significance" the talented critic produces instead.

Why does he want to "get somewhere" with an Ashbery poem? (That might read like I'm invoking some 'play of the signifier' but I'm not. It's the economy of his argument that bothers me).

Thanks for the link :); certainly interesting, & maybe I misunderstand him.

Offline Ubu-Impudicus

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Re: Here are ten sentences
« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2012, 05:13:36 pm »

 I think it was Robert Sheppard who regretted both poetry that was too transparent (spoon feeding) or the kind that was too opaque (the reader or listener just skids across the surface).
 Sure, the kind of poems I would spend time on & return to (e.g. Mallarmé, Celan, Prynne) are expensive of attention, & if readers look for literally paraphrasable "meaning" they'll have a hard time. They might even turn to "critics" for help. Personally I admire critics like Empson not so much for their elucidation of the text but because they have produced out of it an engaging subtext, not a million miles from the way Eliot, for instance, recycles his sources from Baudelaire, Dante, Webster etc. etc.
 If readers fail to perceive or intuit an "inner logic" in difficult poetry, the dilemma would be whether to advise them to return to it again later, or to move on to something more appropriate.
 Ultimately for me a poem elucidates itself, just as different parts of a writer's work can shed light on one another.

Chafing Dish

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Re: Here are ten sentences
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2012, 07:17:39 pm »
Hey Simon, nonsite.org is a relatively new web presence about aesthetics in all its forms, and they welcome critical feedback. Perhaps you might be moved to formulate something of your misgivings about John Gibson's hypothesis to the editorship there?

One response to Gibson (and other authors from the same 'issue' of the magazine) has already been posted, but it doesn't address anything that you have outlined. It's from one Charles Altieri, who had been explicitly invited to respond: http://nonsite.org/feature/charles-altieri-on-jami-bartlett-jennifer-ashton-and-john-gibson

Might be worthwhile to read Bartlett and Ashton articles, but I haven't -- his critique/praise of Gibson occupies the bottom 1/3rd of a rather long piece.

In any case, though, I thought Gibson was indeed quite economical, but also sufficiently cautious in his circumscription of what poetic meaning could, ahem, mean. I'd be interested to see accounts of poetry or even examples of poetry that don't conform to his hypothesis. Ultimately, finding those marvelous non-conformists is in itself often the movens for poetry.

Chafing Dish

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Re: Here are ten sentences
« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2012, 11:57:31 pm »
Here are ten sentences. Please rank them in order of their likelihood to stop/suppress conversation.

1. I wonder what it feels like to fall out of a hammock.
2. My hydrangeas are so tall that I can't see the street anymore.
3. Do peach pits look sad or happy to you?
4. It seems to me that tongues are never perfectly symmetrical.
5. Why are the words 'marshmallow' and 'mushroom' so similar?
6. My podiatrist keeps raving about the benefits of callus-eating fish. Makes me shudder just to think of it.
7. I don't remember the last time I dreamt anything.
8. I keep confusing Fallopian and Eustachian tubes. Which are the ones in your ears?
9. Why isn't there any such thing as a hypnotist-in-residence?
10. So — do you think we'll ever switch to driving on the right side of the street?