Author Topic: The Soup Thread  (Read 20338 times)

Offline martle

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #120 on: October 04, 2010, 07:02:05 pm »
A slight diversion, sorry, but Heinz seem to have a knack for non-tomatoey tomato products, don't they. Heinz Tomato Ketchup just can't be beat sometimes. Nothing else will do on chips, IMHO.
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Antheil

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #121 on: October 04, 2010, 07:38:59 pm »
I don't have any memories of Heinz Tomato soup, flawed or otherwise. No soft focus distant childhood memory or anything like that. Go figure.
You had miserable childhood, didn't all who were denied Heinz soup?
« Last Edit: October 05, 2010, 03:00:48 pm by Antheil »

Offline Morticia

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #122 on: October 04, 2010, 08:35:30 pm »
Heinz seem to have a knack for non-tomatoey tomato products, don't they. Heinz Tomato Ketchup just can't be beat sometimes. Nothing else will do on chips, IMHO.

You're right there Marts. I can't say that I'm the biggest fan of tomato ketchup but sometimes, just sometimes ... and then only Heinz red stuff does the trick  :D They'll never make a fortune out of me though  ;)

Offline perfect wagnerite

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #123 on: October 04, 2010, 08:56:13 pm »
A slight diversion, sorry, but Heinz seem to have a knack for non-tomatoey tomato products, don't they. Heinz Tomato Ketchup just can't be beat sometimes. Nothing else will do on chips, IMHO.

Although it pales in comparison with New Zealand's best kept secret:



Although it's made by Heinz it's a bit less sweet and spicier.  Seriously, expat Kiwis pine for this stuff and go to apparently ridiculous lengths to get hold of it - food packages from the old country etc.   I used to know someone who got it sent over in gallon tins from her parents' fish and chip shop in Palmerston North and supplied Kiwis throughout London with their sauce fix.  There are some shops in London that sell it but it's usually very expensive. It's certainly pretty wonderful stuff.

(And yes, we do have a small stash at Schloss PW)
As a young man I harbored the populist idea of writing for the public. I learned that the public didn't care. So I decided to write for myself. Since then people have gotten interested - Elliott Carter

Offline Andy D

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #124 on: February 27, 2011, 12:42:10 pm »
Hugh Fearnley-thing has a recipe for a "hearty winter soup" in the Guardian - see http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/feb/26/tinned-food-recipes-fearnley-whittingstall

Isn't the precise list of ingredients he gives (rather than a general method) rather contrary to the idea of such a soup? Surely the idea should be to use what you have available? I certainly do.

Offline Morticia

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #125 on: February 27, 2011, 12:58:15 pm »
Maybe he meant it as a kind of 'template' for someone who isn't familiar with the idea of 'storecupboard soup'  :-\  He seemed to lose faith mid-way through when, after stating that fresh out of season tomatoes aren't worth buying, he then suggested them as an alternative to tinned toms  ::)

Like the sound of the black bean soup though :P

Offline MabelJane

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #126 on: February 27, 2011, 02:46:00 pm »
Hugh Fearnley-thing has a recipe for a "hearty winter soup" in the Guardian - see http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/feb/26/tinned-food-recipes-fearnley-whittingstall

Isn't the precise list of ingredients he gives (rather than a general method) rather contrary to the idea of such a soup? Surely the idea should be to use what you have available? I certainly do.

No Andy, you're confusing his storecupboard soup with your "Using Up All the Ancient Wrinkled Veg Crawling Round the Fridge Soup" - which is why his list of ingredients doesn't include half an old cabbage and a mummified lemon.  :P

Selva Oscura

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #127 on: February 27, 2011, 02:55:08 pm »
"Using Up All the Ancient Wrinkled Veg Crawling Round the Fridge Soup"
  :D
I had that for lunch today! (I was feeling like an ancient wrinkled veg myself this morning.)

Offline chivhu

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #128 on: February 27, 2011, 05:00:32 pm »
Heinz Cream of Tomato Soup has been the traditional opener for Christmas dinners in our household, but we don't have it at any6 opther time, and apart from the odd carton of Covent Garden soup picked up from the distressed counter at Tesco, now prefer to make our own.  My wife's speciality is butternut squash and pepper soup, but I have taken up soup making in a major way and we alternate this with carrot and coriander soup, carrot and leek, carrot leek and potato, sometimkes with celery and always with a medium onion cooked in a smidgeon of olive oil..  I will confess to using vegetable stock cubes; naughty I will admit. :)

Antheil

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #129 on: February 27, 2011, 05:21:25 pm »
Heinz Cream of Tomato Soup

I don't know what they put in it but it don't half stain the soup bowls!  Having said that, it is lovely, swirl of cream and chopped parsley, but the other Heinz soups, totally ruined.  Since when did their chicken noodle have sweetcorn and red pepper?

Most chilled soups are rubbish for the price.  I do always have a well stocked cupboard of tinned stuff, various beans in particular butter beans, chick peas, cannelloni, tomatoes of course plus fishy things.

When I was staying with my brother we were discussing foods seldom seen and he said corned beef, so we decided to do a corned beef hash.  I now know what catfood tastes like.

Also, tinned prunes with Greek yoghurt are totally lush!!
« Last Edit: February 27, 2011, 05:24:14 pm by Antheil »

Antheil

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The Soup Thread
« Reply #130 on: February 27, 2011, 05:52:49 pm »
Ignore, keyboard problems.  Probably spilled soup on it.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2011, 06:48:18 pm by Antheil »

Dryphtwood

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #131 on: April 24, 2011, 02:31:33 pm »
Our family loves homemade chicken broth but we hate boiled chicken.

1. Can one get the same quality of broth with just the chicken carcass? Or does the meat contribute something vital to the flavor? (My suspicion is no and yes)

2. Can you countenance discarding a bunch of chicken meat? (I cannot)

3. What can I do with boiled chicken to make it more palatable?

SimonH

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #132 on: April 24, 2011, 02:46:48 pm »
3. What can I do with boiled chicken to make it more palatable?

Roast it instead?

Offline Morticia

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #133 on: April 24, 2011, 02:59:47 pm »
Guess the other option is to boil up a whole bunch of chicken wings with the usual stuff for making broth. Works for me. Chicken taste but without a boiled chook staring accusingly at you when it comes out of the pot. If you had a cat you could give it the wing meat, but you don't. Ah well.

Selva Oscura

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Re: The Soup Thread
« Reply #134 on: April 24, 2011, 04:16:54 pm »
1. Can one get the same quality of broth with just the chicken carcass? Or does the meat contribute something vital to the flavor? (My suspicion is no and yes)
My take on this is actually yes and no. There's always enough of the right stuff left on the carcass to generate a good broth. I always boil up what's left when a roast chicken has been eaten, and the result never seems to have anything missing.