Author Topic: Currently reading  (Read 186624 times)

Offline Walter Od

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1935 on: July 04, 2016, 10:49:40 am »
Elliott Carter's reminiscence of Nadia Boulanger. One of my favourite music things to read - I bought this book in which this essay appears about eight years ago while a student, and although the kind of classical pedagogy described became much less relevant when I started playing jazz guitar, now that I play classical guitar again, it's fallen back on the radar.

I also have Carter's centennial portrait in letters and documents - a very handsome book that I'll probably dig out today.


Offline Don Basilio

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1936 on: July 07, 2016, 09:35:51 pm »
I'm at last reading Milton's Paradise Lost, as deeply admired by Simon Howard.  The language is extraordinary and the theology crap.

And as a sorbet in between selected letters by that fussy old gossip and creator of Strawberry Hill, Horace Walpole.  Out of print, but a nice Everyman hardback courtesy of Abe Books.

We can exercise compassion, compassion born of empathy.  Both words are synonyms for love, by which I don’t mean a romantic feeling but the readiness to give proper attention to whoever or whatever is before our eyes.  Michael Mayne

Offline Walter Od

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1937 on: July 30, 2016, 11:20:27 am »
Finished Graeber's book on debt yesterday. Now onto On Anarchism by Chomsky.


Offline ambootia

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1938 on: July 30, 2016, 12:00:40 pm »
I'm at last reading Milton's Paradise Lost, as deeply admired by Simon Howard.  The language is extraordinary and the theology crap.

Brought a sad smile to my face. That would be exactly why he admired it!

Offline Don Basilio

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1939 on: July 30, 2016, 09:00:09 pm »
And as a sorbet in between selected letters by that fussy old gossip and creator of Strawberry Hill, Horace Walpole.  Out of print, but a nice Everyman hardback courtesy of Abe Books.

I gave a talk on Horace Walpole and C18 Gothick when I was at school.  I didn’t know the term “camp’” but I obviously was sympathetic.



This week I at last got round to visiting Walpole’s house at Strawberry Hill and I loved it.


We can exercise compassion, compassion born of empathy.  Both words are synonyms for love, by which I don’t mean a romantic feeling but the readiness to give proper attention to whoever or whatever is before our eyes.  Michael Mayne

Offline gradus

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1940 on: July 31, 2016, 10:58:12 am »
Olivia Manning's Balkan Trilogy.  Slow start but involving as the thot plickens.

Offline Walter Od

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1941 on: August 19, 2016, 03:34:35 pm »
Finished Graeber's book on debt yesterday. Now onto On Anarchism by Chomsky.

Actually, a day or two after starting On Anarchism I switched to Twentieth-Century Music by Robert P. Morgan, which I finished today.

Compared with my stack of political books, I have an even bigger stack of music books, though not so much a 'stack' - they're scattered about the place.

What now? I think I'll go to the opposite end of history with Hoppin's book on medieval music which, like Morgan's book, I had read a bit as an undergraduate but never from front to cover.

Offline Walter Od

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Offline Don Basilio

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1943 on: October 19, 2016, 03:16:21 pm »
Just dipping into this masterpiece of scatological Neapolitan dialect and reached his version of Cinderella

https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/293590/the-tale-of-tales/
We can exercise compassion, compassion born of empathy.  Both words are synonyms for love, by which I don’t mean a romantic feeling but the readiness to give proper attention to whoever or whatever is before our eyes.  Michael Mayne

Offline ambootia

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1944 on: December 26, 2016, 10:53:09 am »
Just dipping into this masterpiece of scatological Neapolitan dialect and reached his version of Cinderella

https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/293590/the-tale-of-tales/

On your recommendation Don B I ordered that book and am about to read it for reading in the hot days of an Oz Christmas.

On the non-fiction side I've ordered a number of E-books from Verso books on their 90% discount!!!! The printed versions are reduced by 50%, also until January 1st and is very tempting, but I have no space at home, and i mean just that. Not even just space, but I have to do something drastic as cracks have appeared in my work room and it's due to too much weight of possessions (well & me of course). Downstairs I can make space for a bookcase from upstairs, but that's it. So it'll have to be e-books.

What a choice at 90% off - Anybody reading this, do pay a visit. :)  https://www.versobooks.com

Offline Walter Od

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1945 on: December 26, 2016, 12:08:33 pm »
Just last night I decided to take a break from War and Peace to reread Susan Blackmore's Consciousness. I didn't get very far, feeling some what distracted, but it did make me laugh when I got to the bit about qualia - the ineffable subjective qualities of an experience. Here and elsewhere I have used the word 'ineffable' like it's some grand concept reserved only for special pieces of music, but it is here stated quite soberly and matter-of-factly...

Offline Jim Penn

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1946 on: September 02, 2017, 02:09:54 pm »
Out earlier for a mooch in the local Oxfam book shop, as I'm wont to do now and again, and I came across a fascinating little tome: "The Third Floor Front: A View of Broadcasting in the Sixties", by Sir Hugh Greene. A 1969 first edition (I suspect it's never been reprinted!), in excellent nick, including the dust jacket still only with VERY minor wear-and-tear. The still vaguely active cultural historian in me (my first degree was in Cultural Studies) instantly thought this must be something worth picking up and reading, given that I work for one of Auntie's off-shoots, and I committed to buying it even before I'd looked inside.

When I did look inside, I only found that it's SIGNED!

A bargain at one thousand two hundred and ninety nine of your earth pennies.

Offline ahinton

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1947 on: September 02, 2017, 04:13:41 pm »
A bargain at one thousand two hundred and ninety nine of your earth pennies.
Are they the kind that you dig up in the garden?

Offline chivhu

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1948 on: September 03, 2017, 04:28:09 pm »
£12.99?  Seems rather a lot for second hand in your Oxfam (usual prices in our Oxfam £2.50 - 2.90) .

Offline Jim Penn

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Re: Currently reading
« Reply #1949 on: September 03, 2017, 05:14:02 pm »
Not really for a signed first edition! Whereas a normal Oxfam shop would mostly just stock yer Dan Browns, yer Harry Potters and yer Fifty Shades etc, the Oxfam specialised bookshops are really on a par with any other second hand bookshop, and I'd expect to pay that sort of price elsewhere (and a quick look at Abebooks lists unsigned copies of the same book starting at around fourteen quid, so marginally less for a signed one seems pretty good to me).